Children’s Juice Drinks and Sugar

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Nov 162014
 

Children’s Juice Drinks and Sugar

sugar off spoon CMYK

from http://cooks.ndtv.com/article/show/some-children-s-juice-drinks-have-more-sugar-than-coke-619374

Some Children’s Juice Drinks Have More Sugar Than Coke Campaign group says 57 out of 203 supermarket drinks tested had as much sugar as Coca-Cola or more.

Supposedly healthy supermarket smoothies and juices aimed at children can contain up to eight teaspoons of sugar – more than one-and-a-half times as much as in Coca-Cola, according to a survey carried out for a health campaign group.

A quarter of the products tested had at least six teaspoons for every 200ml glass, the maximum adult daily intake recommended by the World Health Organisation, the research found.

The campaign group Action on Sugar analysed 203 juices, juice drinks and smoothies marketed for children and found that more than a quarter (57) contained as much sugar or more than Coca-Cola, which has 10.6g for every 100ml (equivalent to five teaspoons in a 200ml glass). More than half (117) would attract the red warning on the traffic light labelling system for high sugar content.

The group said the drinks were a “major and unnecessary” source of sugars and calories that were contributing to record levels of tooth decay, obesity and type 2 diabetes among children. It urged parents to give children water or whole fruit instead of juice.

Prof Graham MacGregor, of the Wolfson Institute, Queen Mary University of London, and chairman of Action on Sugar, said: “It is a complete scandal that these drinks are marketed to children and parents as if they are healthy. This has to stop. We need to stop Britain’s childhood obesity epidemic spiralling out of control.”

Among the worst offenders were Asda’s Chosen by Kids Tropical Juice From Concentrate, which contained 13g of sugar per 100ml, and Tesco Goodness Slurper Apple & Banana Fruit Smoothie Snack for Kids, which contained 16.1g of sugar per 100ml.

Fifty-nine products also contained sugar or glucose-fructose syrup as an added ingredient, providing unnecessary extra calories and further damage to growing teeth.

UK health guidelines state that a small (150ml) glass of unsweetened 100% fruit juice can count as one of the recommended five a day. But Action on Sugar said this was misleading and should be withdrawn.

Katharine Jenner, campaign director of Action on Sugar, said: “Juice should be an occasional treat, not an everyday drink. These processed drinks are laden with sugar and calories and do not have the nutritional benefits of fresh fruit and vegetables.

 

See full article – http://cooks.ndtv.com/article/show/some-children-s-juice-drinks-have-more-sugar-than-coke-619374

Also Action on Sugar website – www.actiononsalt.org.uk/actiononsugar/index.html

Jun 062013
 

The BBC’s short clip on the Power of Art transforming education is a wonderful testament to the importance of art and music in schools.

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Play video from the BBC’s website

“Over the last several years the focus of US education has been fixed firmly on the sciences. But research shows that the arts help children do better in all subjects and improve the likelihood that they will stay in school longer.

The Obama administration is putting this theory to the test by investing $2m (£1.3m) for arts education in eight of the most poorly performing schools across the country.

At Orchard Gardens Pilot School in Boston, the results have been dramatic. In just three years the students at the once-troubled school have improved their basic academic skills and many say the arts have changed their lives.

Jane O’Brien looks at the impact of art in education in the sixth and final instalment of the Power of Art series.”

May 142013
 

Face to face empathic communication is essential for our health.  Barbara Fredrickson, Professor of Psychology at the University of North Carolina, writes in the New York Times about the cost of instant electronic media on our well being.  Technology has assisted us in communicating more rapidly – the question is how do we balance our increasing reliance on technology with time for meaningful, loving kindness interactions.

Soon to be released ‘Spontaneous Acts of Love’, Meditations and Reflections for Parents, by Jane Hanckel, part of the Eco Parenting Series, provides an invaluable resource for contemplative connected parenting.

“All around you are the keys to knowing – in nature, in the arts and crafts of the generations before us. Be open to the beauty that surrounds you. In that beauty the wonder and mystery of the Earth are revealed.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/24/opinion/sunday/your-phone-vs-your-heart.html?_r=0

 

 

Mar 102013
 

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has released a new report co-produced with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), titled: State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDC’s).

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals, EDC’s, include Bisphenol-A (BPA), PCB’s, phthalates and agricultural pesticides that are in everyday items such as plastic water bottles, shower curtains, beauty products (including nail polish, hair spray, shampoo, deodorants, and fragrances), vinyl floor coverings, and more. The joint study highlights a range of health problems associated with EDC’s including breast cancer in women; developmental effects on the nervous system in children and attention deficit hyperactivity in children.

Theo Colborn, Ph.D., President of the Endocrine Disruption Exchange talks about chemicals, parents and dreams of the future for our children.

Theo asks ‘Where are parents going to get information to help understand the myriad of factors in the environment and the effect on their children’. ‘Growing Greener Children’ is such a resource for parents.

Further information : Common Household Chemicals Linked to Human Disease in Landmark UN Study’ Dr Mercola’s website

 

 

 

 

 

Dec 052012
 

“For the child…it is not half so important to know as to feel. If facts are the seeds that later produce knowledge and wisdom, then the emotions and the impressions of the senses are the fertile soil in which the seeds must grow…. It is more important to pave the way for a child to want to know than to put him on a diet of facts that he is not ready to assimilate.”
Rachel Carson

“First and foremost, our job as heart-centered educators must be to understand the potential of each ‘seed’ we are nurturing.  The great Spanish cellist Pablo Casals said it well: ‘The child must know that he (or she) is a miracle, that since the beginning of the world there hasn’t been, and until the end of the world there will not be, another child like him (or her).’  Supporting the miracle of each child’s uniqueness does not lend itself to standardization.  It is not ‘convenient.’  It may seem easier to find a one-size-fits-all way of delivering and assessing learning, but if we pay attention, the natural world will help us realize the futility of trying to do so.  Nothing in nature, including human beings, can be completely ‘standardized.’ (1)

We need to advocate for an education based on the understanding of our children’s uniqueness. This is a fundamental right of every child.

Jane Hanckel

(1) http://www.childcareexchange.com/eed/view/3223/

Aug 262012
 

 

Can shopping save the world? The Story of Change urges viewers to put down their credit cards and start exercising their citizen muscles to build a more sustainable, just and fulfilling world.  From the makers of the Story of Stuff www.storyofstuff.org

Being a citizen is about acting on our responsibility to stand up for the planet and our children.

Eco parenting is currently developing an innovative, engaging and interactive 3D ‘look inside the human body’. This 3D pilot will demonstrate a child’s wellbeing and the links to diet, lifestyle and environment. If you would like to support this project and receive a one on one consultation with Jane Hanckel and a signed copy of her book then please click here.

Mar 162012
 

Healthy food does not have to be more expensive. The Harvard School of Public Health’s Health Prevention Research Center came up with simple tips for after school programs to keep the cost of healthier snacks down:

  • Do not serve sugar-sweetened beverages.
  • Serve water every day.
  • Serve a fruit and/or low-priced vegetable (such as carrots or celery) every day.
  • Allocate price savings from replacing 100% juice with tap water towards purchasing and serving whole fruit because of its higher fiber content and effects on satiety.
  • Offer fresh fruits or vegetables over more expensive canned or frozen versions.
  • When serving grains (such as bread, crackers, and cereals), serve whole grains.
  • Avoid foods with trans fat.

These tips are useful for parents wanting to save money and provide healthy food for their children.  The ‘eco parenting – growing greener children’ book is an excellent evidence based research book that provide multitudinous reasons why parents should choose healthy food for their children.

 

Feb 282012
 

 

The rose is said to represent purity and perfection and now it has been documented that it can reduce stress.  The Japanese Journal of Pharmacology reported that researchers found that the simple inhalation of patchouli and rose oil reduced sympathetic nervous activity by 40%, with rose oil reducing adrenaline concentrations by 30%. (1)

When my son was in kindergarten, he would receive a lavender face wash before leaving for the day.  In the last five years we have introduced using flower essences along with other eco parenting initiatives, into parent education programs in Australia.  Children and parents receive massages with a fine sphagni rose or lavender oil.  A lavender face wash is used to help settle the children at rest time.  The parents have reported that the children are calmer and more relaxed.  They are now using the oils to help their children get a good nights sleep.

(1) Green Med Info, http://bit.ly/w0QO0r