Children’s Juice Drinks and Sugar

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Nov 162014
 

Children’s Juice Drinks and Sugar

sugar off spoon CMYK

from http://cooks.ndtv.com/article/show/some-children-s-juice-drinks-have-more-sugar-than-coke-619374

Some Children’s Juice Drinks Have More Sugar Than Coke Campaign group says 57 out of 203 supermarket drinks tested had as much sugar as Coca-Cola or more.

Supposedly healthy supermarket smoothies and juices aimed at children can contain up to eight teaspoons of sugar – more than one-and-a-half times as much as in Coca-Cola, according to a survey carried out for a health campaign group.

A quarter of the products tested had at least six teaspoons for every 200ml glass, the maximum adult daily intake recommended by the World Health Organisation, the research found.

The campaign group Action on Sugar analysed 203 juices, juice drinks and smoothies marketed for children and found that more than a quarter (57) contained as much sugar or more than Coca-Cola, which has 10.6g for every 100ml (equivalent to five teaspoons in a 200ml glass). More than half (117) would attract the red warning on the traffic light labelling system for high sugar content.

The group said the drinks were a “major and unnecessary” source of sugars and calories that were contributing to record levels of tooth decay, obesity and type 2 diabetes among children. It urged parents to give children water or whole fruit instead of juice.

Prof Graham MacGregor, of the Wolfson Institute, Queen Mary University of London, and chairman of Action on Sugar, said: “It is a complete scandal that these drinks are marketed to children and parents as if they are healthy. This has to stop. We need to stop Britain’s childhood obesity epidemic spiralling out of control.”

Among the worst offenders were Asda’s Chosen by Kids Tropical Juice From Concentrate, which contained 13g of sugar per 100ml, and Tesco Goodness Slurper Apple & Banana Fruit Smoothie Snack for Kids, which contained 16.1g of sugar per 100ml.

Fifty-nine products also contained sugar or glucose-fructose syrup as an added ingredient, providing unnecessary extra calories and further damage to growing teeth.

UK health guidelines state that a small (150ml) glass of unsweetened 100% fruit juice can count as one of the recommended five a day. But Action on Sugar said this was misleading and should be withdrawn.

Katharine Jenner, campaign director of Action on Sugar, said: “Juice should be an occasional treat, not an everyday drink. These processed drinks are laden with sugar and calories and do not have the nutritional benefits of fresh fruit and vegetables.

 

See full article – http://cooks.ndtv.com/article/show/some-children-s-juice-drinks-have-more-sugar-than-coke-619374

Also Action on Sugar website – www.actiononsalt.org.uk/actiononsugar/index.html

Apr 112014
 

A new study indicates that children who view a simulated forest environment whilst exercising are more likely to experience health enhancing effects after the activity.  A UK university study of children aged 9-10 years, published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Health, found that after a series of 15 minute moderate intensity cycling activities the children’s post-activity blood pressure was significantly lower than it was without the simulated forest environment, indicating that the nature scenes promoted positive health effects.

Walking can increase life expectancy

Dr Michael Duncan, lead author of the study and associate head of the Department of Applied Sciences and Health at Coventry University, said:

“If there is indeed a correlation between viewing scenes of nature and a lower blood pressure post exercise, as indicated by our data, it could have very positive implications in encouraging public health practitioners to prescribe outdoor exercise to reduce health risk.”

More information:  http://blogs.coventry.ac.uk/researchblog/health-benefits-green-exercise-kids-shown-new-study/

Feb 112014
 

A practical workshop about how to raise children who are creative, imaginative and empowered to find their own freedom, potential and purpose in life.Eco Inspired Logo - education, health and wellbeing

JOIN US at the Mullumbimby Community Gardens – starting 25th February 9.30am – 11.30am

In the workshop you will learn about

  • Creating Sacred Spaces – How to create healthy environments for you and your family
  • Power of Art – Fun Arts and Craft Activities for Young Children using natural materials
  • Mind-Body Nutrition – practical simple ideas for your and family meals
  • Transform your Mind – simple strategies to support positive change in you and your family’s life

Course Includes :

  • Natural toy and craft making for children
  • Bread making – create your own delicious organic wholemeal bread
  • Songs and games for early childhood

“Jane has a fascinating story and shares that she has been teaching her Steiner based understanding of the deeper stories and rhythms of early childhood out in more remote Indigenous communities. She is very into the deep nourishing and unfolding of this magical ‘Kingdom’ of early childhood, and uses the practical exercises of these eco parenting workshops to help share ways  for parents to support and  enrich this early childhood experience.
The course is for adult learning, so wont have a child focus as such, but bubs toddlers and children are welcome.”
Inica Star, January 2014

Tuesday x 4 sessions     $100 + $10 materials           MCG members $95 + $10 materials      Mullumbimby Community Gardens, Stuart St, Mullumbimby,  Northern NSW,  2482

Workshop presenter: Jane Hanckel is an early childhood advocate and author of ‘Eco Parenting Growing Greener Children’ an evidence based book on how to raise healthy, happy children. Jane’s work is informed by a Steiner approach to early childhood.

For more information contact: info@ecoparenting.net

Jun 062013
 

The BBC’s short clip on the Power of Art transforming education is a wonderful testament to the importance of art and music in schools.

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Play video from the BBC’s website

“Over the last several years the focus of US education has been fixed firmly on the sciences. But research shows that the arts help children do better in all subjects and improve the likelihood that they will stay in school longer.

The Obama administration is putting this theory to the test by investing $2m (£1.3m) for arts education in eight of the most poorly performing schools across the country.

At Orchard Gardens Pilot School in Boston, the results have been dramatic. In just three years the students at the once-troubled school have improved their basic academic skills and many say the arts have changed their lives.

Jane O’Brien looks at the impact of art in education in the sixth and final instalment of the Power of Art series.”

May 142013
 

Face to face empathic communication is essential for our health.  Barbara Fredrickson, Professor of Psychology at the University of North Carolina, writes in the New York Times about the cost of instant electronic media on our well being.  Technology has assisted us in communicating more rapidly – the question is how do we balance our increasing reliance on technology with time for meaningful, loving kindness interactions.

Soon to be released ‘Spontaneous Acts of Love’, Meditations and Reflections for Parents, by Jane Hanckel, part of the Eco Parenting Series, provides an invaluable resource for contemplative connected parenting.

“All around you are the keys to knowing – in nature, in the arts and crafts of the generations before us. Be open to the beauty that surrounds you. In that beauty the wonder and mystery of the Earth are revealed.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/24/opinion/sunday/your-phone-vs-your-heart.html?_r=0

 

 

Mar 282013
 

Boy with Autism Recovers After Gluten-free Casein-free Diet

Many parents know that diet and environment can change children’s behaviour. In this video a mother and Dr Kenneth Bock discuss how a gluten and dairy free diet helped her son recover from autism.

Dr Bock recommends also that children and families avoid chemicals, pesticides and other possible contributors to autism such as phthalates in plastic.

‘Growing Greener Children’ is a great first step comprehensive resource for parents wanting to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

 

 

Mar 262013
 

If you change the beginning of the story you change the whole story is the message from Dr Dimitri Christakis talking on TEDx about media and children.

Typically the age children in 1970’s started watched television regularly was 4 years, now it’s 4 months. The typical child under child of 5 years is watching 4-5 hours a day.

Dimitri’s talk clearly outlines the effects of too much television on the child’s developing brain.

Mar 102013
 

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has released a new report co-produced with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), titled: State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDC’s).

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals, EDC’s, include Bisphenol-A (BPA), PCB’s, phthalates and agricultural pesticides that are in everyday items such as plastic water bottles, shower curtains, beauty products (including nail polish, hair spray, shampoo, deodorants, and fragrances), vinyl floor coverings, and more. The joint study highlights a range of health problems associated with EDC’s including breast cancer in women; developmental effects on the nervous system in children and attention deficit hyperactivity in children.

Theo Colborn, Ph.D., President of the Endocrine Disruption Exchange talks about chemicals, parents and dreams of the future for our children.

Theo asks ‘Where are parents going to get information to help understand the myriad of factors in the environment and the effect on their children’. ‘Growing Greener Children’ is such a resource for parents.

Further information : Common Household Chemicals Linked to Human Disease in Landmark UN Study’ Dr Mercola’s website

 

 

 

 

 

Feb 082013
 

… as things stand we’re all being used as guinea pigs in the great test of new product safety.”
-Mark Bittman, The Cosmetics Wars, The New York Times, Feb. 6, 2013

Mark Bittman’s article on cosmetics testing in The New York Times highlights the fact that personal care product makers don’t have to prove that the ingredients in their shampoos, toothpastes or other cosmetics are safe before you use them.

The Environmental Working Group (E.W.G.) offers a database of more than 79,000 personal care products, from soap to lip plumper ranked by level of hazard. The database is an excellent way to find out what is in you and your children’s products.