Jan 302013
 

The film,  ‘Play Again’  highlights the importance of play and nature and asks the question ‘What are the consequences of a childhood removed from nature?’.

The film’s synopsis : –

‘One generation from now most people in the U.S. will have spent more time in the virtual world than in nature. New media technologies have improved our lives in countless ways. Information now appears with a click. Overseas friends are part of our daily lives. And even grandma loves Wii.

But what are we missing when we are behind screens? And how will this impact our children, our society, and eventually, our planet? At a time when children play more behind screens than outside, PLAY AGAIN explores the changing balance between the virtual and natural worlds. Is our connection to nature disappearing down the digital rabbit hole?

This moving and humorous documentary follows six teenagers who, like the “average American child,” spend five to fifteen hours a day behind screens. PLAY AGAIN unplugs these teens and takes them on their first wilderness adventure – no electricity, no cell phone coverage, no virtual reality.

Through the voices of children and leading experts including journalist Richard Louv, sociologist Juliet Schor, environmental writer Bill McKibben, educators Diane Levin and Nancy Carlsson-Paige, neuroscientist Gary Small, parks advocate Charles Jordan, and geneticist David Suzuki, PLAY AGAIN investigates the consequences of a childhood removed from nature and encourages action for a sustainable future.’

From more information www.playagain.com

Dec 142011
 

Physicians Speak Out on the Importance of Play for Children’s Health

Dr. Ken Ginsburg, pediatrician at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and author of Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Giving Kids Roots and Wings, and Dr. Marilyn Benoit, Chief Clinical Officer at Devereux Behavioral Health and former president of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, address critical issues facing children and families today — rising levels of stress and anxiety, obesity-related health problems, dramatically reduced time for free play and play outdoors, hectic and overscheduled family life — and offer solutions to addressing these problems.

This video was produced in collaboration with the Alliance for Childhood and KaBOOM!. http://www.allianceforchildhood.org/ and http://kaboom.org

The promotion of creative, free imaginative play, along with healthy food and natural environments are key principles of the Inspir=Ed Spirit of Childhood early childhood programs which have had great success in introducing imaginative play and healthy food in communities across Australia. www.spiritofchildhood.org  

Nov 012011
 

 

ADHD, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, is the most commonly diagnosed behavioural disorder in childhood.  It has significant repercussions for the child and their family as well as affecting the child’s school performance, well-being and social interactions.

In 2001 the  American Academy of Pediatrics issued guidelines for treatment for the evaluation and diagnosis of ADHD.  Now they have extended the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in children from 6 to 12 years to 4 to 18 years. The guidelines, “ADHD: Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder,” were released at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference on October 16th and published in Academy’s Pediatrics.

The work of Inspir=Ed and the Spirit of Childhood Foundation, outlined in the research based book ‘eco parenting – growing greener children’  by Jane Hanckel provides strong arguments about the need to look at the environment, diet and lifestyle together with practical advice on how to avoid environmental triggers related to children’s behavioural disorders.

 


Natural environments, both indoors and outdoors, provide children with a calm and nurturing place to play and learn