Feb 112014
 

A practical workshop about how to raise children who are creative, imaginative and empowered to find their own freedom, potential and purpose in life.Eco Inspired Logo - education, health and wellbeing

JOIN US at the Mullumbimby Community Gardens – starting 25th February 9.30am – 11.30am

In the workshop you will learn about

  • Creating Sacred Spaces – How to create healthy environments for you and your family
  • Power of Art – Fun Arts and Craft Activities for Young Children using natural materials
  • Mind-Body Nutrition – practical simple ideas for your and family meals
  • Transform your Mind – simple strategies to support positive change in you and your family’s life

Course Includes :

  • Natural toy and craft making for children
  • Bread making – create your own delicious organic wholemeal bread
  • Songs and games for early childhood

“Jane has a fascinating story and shares that she has been teaching her Steiner based understanding of the deeper stories and rhythms of early childhood out in more remote Indigenous communities. She is very into the deep nourishing and unfolding of this magical ‘Kingdom’ of early childhood, and uses the practical exercises of these eco parenting workshops to help share ways  for parents to support and  enrich this early childhood experience.
The course is for adult learning, so wont have a child focus as such, but bubs toddlers and children are welcome.”
Inica Star, January 2014

Tuesday x 4 sessions     $100 + $10 materials           MCG members $95 + $10 materials      Mullumbimby Community Gardens, Stuart St, Mullumbimby,  Northern NSW,  2482

Workshop presenter: Jane Hanckel is an early childhood advocate and author of ‘Eco Parenting Growing Greener Children’ an evidence based book on how to raise healthy, happy children. Jane’s work is informed by a Steiner approach to early childhood.

For more information contact: info@ecoparenting.net

May 142013
 

Face to face empathic communication is essential for our health.  Barbara Fredrickson, Professor of Psychology at the University of North Carolina, writes in the New York Times about the cost of instant electronic media on our well being.  Technology has assisted us in communicating more rapidly – the question is how do we balance our increasing reliance on technology with time for meaningful, loving kindness interactions.

Soon to be released ‘Spontaneous Acts of Love’, Meditations and Reflections for Parents, by Jane Hanckel, part of the Eco Parenting Series, provides an invaluable resource for contemplative connected parenting.

“All around you are the keys to knowing – in nature, in the arts and crafts of the generations before us. Be open to the beauty that surrounds you. In that beauty the wonder and mystery of the Earth are revealed.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/24/opinion/sunday/your-phone-vs-your-heart.html?_r=0

 

 

Mar 282013
 

Boy with Autism Recovers After Gluten-free Casein-free Diet

Many parents know that diet and environment can change children’s behaviour. In this video a mother and Dr Kenneth Bock discuss how a gluten and dairy free diet helped her son recover from autism.

Dr Bock recommends also that children and families avoid chemicals, pesticides and other possible contributors to autism such as phthalates in plastic.

‘Growing Greener Children’ is a great first step comprehensive resource for parents wanting to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

 

 

Mar 262013
 

If you change the beginning of the story you change the whole story is the message from Dr Dimitri Christakis talking on TEDx about media and children.

Typically the age children in 1970’s started watched television regularly was 4 years, now it’s 4 months. The typical child under child of 5 years is watching 4-5 hours a day.

Dimitri’s talk clearly outlines the effects of too much television on the child’s developing brain.

Mar 102013
 

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has released a new report co-produced with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), titled: State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDC’s).

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals, EDC’s, include Bisphenol-A (BPA), PCB’s, phthalates and agricultural pesticides that are in everyday items such as plastic water bottles, shower curtains, beauty products (including nail polish, hair spray, shampoo, deodorants, and fragrances), vinyl floor coverings, and more. The joint study highlights a range of health problems associated with EDC’s including breast cancer in women; developmental effects on the nervous system in children and attention deficit hyperactivity in children.

Theo Colborn, Ph.D., President of the Endocrine Disruption Exchange talks about chemicals, parents and dreams of the future for our children.

Theo asks ‘Where are parents going to get information to help understand the myriad of factors in the environment and the effect on their children’. ‘Growing Greener Children’ is such a resource for parents.

Further information : Common Household Chemicals Linked to Human Disease in Landmark UN Study’ Dr Mercola’s website

 

 

 

 

 

Dec 052012
 

“For the child…it is not half so important to know as to feel. If facts are the seeds that later produce knowledge and wisdom, then the emotions and the impressions of the senses are the fertile soil in which the seeds must grow…. It is more important to pave the way for a child to want to know than to put him on a diet of facts that he is not ready to assimilate.”
Rachel Carson

“First and foremost, our job as heart-centered educators must be to understand the potential of each ‘seed’ we are nurturing.  The great Spanish cellist Pablo Casals said it well: ‘The child must know that he (or she) is a miracle, that since the beginning of the world there hasn’t been, and until the end of the world there will not be, another child like him (or her).’  Supporting the miracle of each child’s uniqueness does not lend itself to standardization.  It is not ‘convenient.’  It may seem easier to find a one-size-fits-all way of delivering and assessing learning, but if we pay attention, the natural world will help us realize the futility of trying to do so.  Nothing in nature, including human beings, can be completely ‘standardized.’ (1)

We need to advocate for an education based on the understanding of our children’s uniqueness. This is a fundamental right of every child.

Jane Hanckel

(1) http://www.childcareexchange.com/eed/view/3223/

Mar 162012
 

Healthy food does not have to be more expensive. The Harvard School of Public Health’s Health Prevention Research Center came up with simple tips for after school programs to keep the cost of healthier snacks down:

  • Do not serve sugar-sweetened beverages.
  • Serve water every day.
  • Serve a fruit and/or low-priced vegetable (such as carrots or celery) every day.
  • Allocate price savings from replacing 100% juice with tap water towards purchasing and serving whole fruit because of its higher fiber content and effects on satiety.
  • Offer fresh fruits or vegetables over more expensive canned or frozen versions.
  • When serving grains (such as bread, crackers, and cereals), serve whole grains.
  • Avoid foods with trans fat.

These tips are useful for parents wanting to save money and provide healthy food for their children.  The ‘eco parenting – growing greener children’ book is an excellent evidence based research book that provide multitudinous reasons why parents should choose healthy food for their children.

 

Nov 272011
 

Christmas 2011 – Birth of a New Tradition

from Suzanne Staples www.heartandspirit.com.au

As the holidays approach, the giant Asian factories are kicking into high gear to provide Australians with monstrous piles of cheaply produced goods — merchandise that has been produced at the expense of Australian labour.??This year will be different. This year Australians will give the gift of genuine concern for other Australians. There is no longer an excuse that, at gift-giving time, nothing can be found that is produced by Australian hands.  Yes there is!??It’s time to think outside the box, people.  Who says a gift needs to fit in a shirt box, wrapped in Chinese produced wrapping paper???

Everyone — yes EVERYONE gets their hair cut.  How about gift certificates from your local Australian hair salon or barber???Gym membership?  It’s appropriate for all ages who are thinking about some health improvement.??Who wouldn’t appreciate getting their car detailed?  Small, Australian-owned detail shops and car washes would love to sell you a gift certificate or a book of gift certificates.??Are you one of those extravagant givers who think nothing of plonking down the dollars on a Chinese made flat-screen?  Perhaps that grateful gift receiver would like his driveway sealed, or lawn mowed for the summer, or games at the local golf course.??

There are a lots of Australian owner-run restaurants — all offering gift certificates.  And, if your intended isn’t the fancy eatery sort, what about a half-dozen breakfasts at the local breakfast joint.  Remember, folks this isn’t about big National chains — this is about supporting your home town Australians with their financial lives on the line to keep their doors open.??

How many people couldn’t use an oil change for their car, truck or motorcycle, done at a shop run by the Australian working guy???Thinking about a heartfelt gift for mom?  Mom would LOVE the services of a local cleaning lady for a day.?? My computer could use a tune-up, and I KNOW I can find some young guy who is struggling to get his repair business up and running.

??OK, you were looking for something more personal.  Local crafts people spin their own wool and knit them into scarves.  They make jewellery, and pottery and beautiful wooden boxes.??Plan your holiday outings at local, owner-operated restaurants and. How about going out to see a play or ballet at your hometown theatre.?? Musicians need love too, so find a venue showcasing local bands.??

Honestly, people, do you REALLY need to buy another ten thousand Chinese lights for the house?  When you buy a five dollar string of lights, about fifty cents stays in the community.  If you have those kinds of bucks to burn, leave the postie, garbo or babysitter a nice BIG tip.??

You see, Christmas is no longer about draining Australian pockets so that China can build another glittering city.  Christmas is now about caring about us, encouraging Australian small businesses to keep plugging away to follow their dreams. And, when we care about other Australians, we care about our communities, and the benefits come back to us in ways we couldn’t imagine.?

THIS is the new Australian Christmas tradition.?? Forward this to everyone on your mailing list — post it to discussion groups — send it to the editor of your local paper and radio stations, and TV news departments.. This is a revolution of caring about each other, and isn’t that what Christmas is about?