Dec 052012
 

“For the child…it is not half so important to know as to feel. If facts are the seeds that later produce knowledge and wisdom, then the emotions and the impressions of the senses are the fertile soil in which the seeds must grow…. It is more important to pave the way for a child to want to know than to put him on a diet of facts that he is not ready to assimilate.”
Rachel Carson

“First and foremost, our job as heart-centered educators must be to understand the potential of each ‘seed’ we are nurturing.  The great Spanish cellist Pablo Casals said it well: ‘The child must know that he (or she) is a miracle, that since the beginning of the world there hasn’t been, and until the end of the world there will not be, another child like him (or her).’  Supporting the miracle of each child’s uniqueness does not lend itself to standardization.  It is not ‘convenient.’  It may seem easier to find a one-size-fits-all way of delivering and assessing learning, but if we pay attention, the natural world will help us realize the futility of trying to do so.  Nothing in nature, including human beings, can be completely ‘standardized.’ (1)

We need to advocate for an education based on the understanding of our children’s uniqueness. This is a fundamental right of every child.

Jane Hanckel

(1) http://www.childcareexchange.com/eed/view/3223/

  One Response to “Seeds of knowledge”

  1. How beautiful this post is, and what a blessing it is for our children to bring us back to the feeling and natural world also! 🙂

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